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The replica N414WW

It began when an associate of museum owner Dan Haynes contacted Steven W. Stull, Airwolf fan and craftsman of fine reproduction props. As he wanted to pay tribute to the Airwolf helicopter in some way, Mr. Haynes' associate sought to sell Steven's reproduction helmets and flight suits in the museum gift shop. Since the original Airwolf helicopter and filming mock-up had previously been destroyed by accident and post-show deconstruction, selling replica costumes seemed the best salute. Little did Mr. Haynes and his associate expect just how far Mr. Stull and his friends could and would help him improve upon that vision for a modest salute to the show by coming together to build a new Airwolf.

 

First, Haynes purchased a decommissioned Bell 222 airframe and components which had previously been scouted for this purpose by airwolf.tv's own Clark Van Hoten and Roy Nelson. The airframe would then be transported by truck to Stull's workshop in Dawsonville, Georgia to become the new Airwolf. Thus, on Thursday April 6, 2006, airframe serial number 47042, previously registered as N414WW, arrived at Mr. Stull's lakeside shop to begin the conversion.

 

With access to original Airwolf plans and components and in collaboration with other subject matter experts, Steven began to create the first true Airwolf replica. Initially, the Airwolf helicopter will hang from the museum ceiling at eye level with the second floor. It will be on display among other rare pieces, including the Army's prototype Commanche helicopter. After the museum's initial year, Airwolf will be removed to be rennovated internally by Stull, Van Hoten and Srodzinski. It will return as a floor-level display to show off the full beauty of the cockpit.

The museum was unsuccessful so Stull loaned it out to the Tennessee Museum of Avation in Sevierville, Tennessee between 2007-2015 before selling it to a private collector in California.

 

The owner sent it to Westcoast Custom for a paint touch up on a couple of parts that unfortunately had some issues due to a rushed job by a mechanic. The mechanic didn't use hardener or sealers that made the nose and the pilot door bubble and look different from the rest. 

After it came back from WCC it was displayed on the roof of a $250M mansion before it was sold to the Tomorrow's Aeronautical Museum in 2020.

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Helicopter Headquarters, Pigeon Forge, Tennessee 
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Tennesse Museum of Aviation, Seiersville
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Westcoast Custom
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Tomorrow's Aeronautical Museum
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